This is the final post of a three part series: In the previous two blogs I discussed the importance of developing a mentor-mentee relationship and creating open channels of communication.  This week, I consider the unprecedented opportunity that lies in affording employees the flexibility to balance their professional and personal lives. The first two blogs in this series are available here.

Afford Flexibility. The work-life balance is a challenging task for most employees. Effectively balancing one’s professional and personal life is one of the key factors professionals evaluate when seeking employment. Offer team members the flexibility to attend their child’s holiday parade at school or to take a day off before a long weekend if they are traveling. In addition, understand the ebb and flow of employees’ work rhythms, and where possible, incorporate the times at which they are most productive into a flexible time schedule. For some, it is early in the morning, while others are most productive burning the midnight oil.

Career Growth, Training and Development. Offer training opportunities to employees and encourage them to attend seminars and conferences. Providing an accessible path for professional development not only keeps employees engaged, but shows that you are invested in their long-term personal and professional success.

Recognition and Reward. Publically recognize and praise employees for a job well done – an encouraging motivator that shows you notice and appreciate their efforts.  If the budget allows, give promotions when they are earned and increase or redistribute responsibilities. Recognize employees’ efforts and success by taking them for lunch or giving them tickets to a sporting event.

Essentially, remember that all employees want to work in an environment where they feel valued, respected, and appreciated. It is through your thought, word, and deed that employees are inspired to succeed, and in turn, your organization thrives.

From mentorship to flexibility, developing and nurturing a successful, cohesive team requires taking a dedicated and consistent approach to management. As an executive recruiter in the field of Human Resources, I’d like to hear what steps you have taken to invest in your employee engagement and retention strategies.

 

John Prpich

Aram, your article makes a quintessential mistake, it focuses on the symptoms of engagement, not the root cause. This is compounded by our inability to recognize what’s the real issue is at hand, hiring people that aren’t motivated and don’t have an I can do it, attitude.

Don’t get me wrong, the three areas you mentioned have value and add to the overall company experience, but it doesn’t address the real issue, poor selection.


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